My PC was dual-purpose for most of its life existing as a desktop PC and a server for the various functions we needed. As the PC aged I started moving apps to the cloud or other devices. I previously posted about how to Host Plex on AWS and Wasabi. That post explains some of the “whys” behind my decisions for that solution. Another central app is Ubiquiti’s Unifi Video software which runs my security cameras.

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AWS Immersion Day

This week I attended my first AWS Immersion Day. The event was hosted by Justin McWhirter [justindm.me]. The focus of the day was serverless, and was centered around the Wild Rydes Workshops. By the end of the day we ended up with a web application that looked like this that was built upon many integrated AWS services such as Cognito, Kinesis, S3, Lambda, Amplify, API Gateway, and more. As someone who spends my time generally focused on networking within AWS this was a welcomed change of pace and a good learning experience.

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Wasabi Storage Storage is one of the costliest options in the cloud and probably the biggest deterrent to migration. Fortunately, a handful of contenders are changing the game and breaking into affordable options for personal budgets. One of these companies is Wasabi. I have embraced the AWS platform, so on the surface this appears to be in opposition to that. Maybe it is, but Wasabi utilizes AWS S3 on the backend with a pricing strategy fit for personal as well as business use.

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As I’ve stated in previous posts, I currently use CloudFlare as my CDN. There are several reasons for this that I won’t go into now. One of the “ToDo’s” on my list has been to clear CloudFlare’s cache when I upload new content to my blog. I was finally able to spend some time and get that done. CloudFlare API To start things off I reviewed the doc for the CloudFlare API.

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It’s important to know your limits. In this case study we find a situation stemming from SMTP being throttled. This is part of the packet capture I received: The top lines show the previous conversation ending. SMTP successfully sent 3 messages. After the 3rd message the mail server stopped responding and retransmits began. This pattern was repeatable. More than that it was repeatable from other EC2 instances. The only thing between the EC2 instances and the mail server was a router and a firewall.

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Alexa App for Kids

If you refer to this post, you’ll see that one of my objectives for this year was to develop an Alexa app for my kids. Well, I am happy to report this objective as completed. The cover art and the image below show the high level architecture. The app idea actually started based on something I was doing for my kids that they really took a liking to. Unfortunately, for this post it might be an idea that I could actually publish and potentially monetize.

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Being that I recently took the plunge to a static site hosted on AWS S3 I thought I would create a post outlining the high-level process for future reference. There are quite a few blogs in the interwebs outining this process, but if this helps someone else too then it’s a win-win. If you are curious as to WHY I migrated, you can find a short bit about that in this post.

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Moving to S3

Moving to S3 I’m currently in the process of moving my blog to Amazon S3. I’m not the first to do this and I won’t be the last. My reasons for this are similar to everyone else. Wordpress is an excellent blogging and site platform. I have really enjoyed working with it and getting to know its innards. As I continuously evaluate the purpose of my site though, I have to keep the technology behind it in sync.

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Shuffle Sharding

So, all credit goes to Colm MacCárthaigh for this one. I think his recent post on Shuffle Sharding is so go it deserves a share and a place on my blog to serve as a reminder for me from time-to-time. This is one way AWS achieves the level of reliability and stability it has for its customers. Some of the methodology can easily be applied to traditional and on-prem infrastructure though as well.

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Chris Sereno

For 11 years networking was my profession with a specialized focus on proactive and reactive performance analysis. More recently I have embraced the AWS platform. This blog reflects my experience both past and present.

AWS Architect at Caterpillar, Inc.

US